School’s in.

This week, we’ll peek at the made-over version of a grand old beauty for Norm’s Thursday Doors.

This 3-storey cut-stone building held memories for many folks in the small town of Fergus, Ontario.

May 18 (4 of 4)

 

In 1927, Fergus High School was built on a hill overlooking a provincial highway. It served the small town and surrounding community for nearly 80 years. The stately design and quality craftsmanship is indicative of the value placed on education by the community at the time.

Fergus High School Circa 1930

Fergus High School, ca. 1930. Photo courtesy Wellington County Museum and Archives. 

 

In the years since the school closed in 2004, ivy spread unchecked, its spidery tendrils enveloping the front doors. You get the idea from the photo below, found on the township’s website, but I couldn’t find one that captured the building’s pre-restoration vibe of abandonment. I didn’t pass through Fergus often, but when I did, I was always both enamored and unsettled by the imposing facade.

Fergus High School Ivy

Photo courtesy www.centrewellington.ca. Date unknown.

 

Fortunately, the former school was protected by a heritage designation in 2006. The site was purchased by Reid’s Heritage Homes, a residential builder. Two condominiums were built behind the school, but Reid’s made the decision to sever the property and put the building up for sale in 2012, with an asking price of nearly $1 million.

The structure was purchased in 2014, and after the necessary renovations and rejuvenation, it became home to Emmanuel Christian High School.

Below are some shots I made of the school as it stands today. As you can see, it’s had a significant ‘haircut.’ Now, we can see its beautiful face. 🙂

May 18 (1 of 4)May 18 (2 of 4)May 18 (3 of 4)

Thanks, as always, for visiting.

P.S.
I learned about this building herehere, and here.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “School’s in.

    • I’ve heard, too, that ivy can really hurt a building! It can make an otherwise unremarkable building look distinguished, but when you’ve got something like this cut stone underneath, it’s unnecessary. Thanks for checking out the photos 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

Share your thoughts here:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s