Halls of pine.

The trouble with playing around with the intentional camera movement technique is that I have a hard time choosing my favourite shots – I love the streaks and blurs created by dialing in a slower shutter speed and moving the camera during the exposure. There’s a lot of trial and error involved, and I end up throwing away a lot of messy photos, but I’m usually pleased overall. Plus, it’s kind of liberating to purposely throw a picture out of focus. Here are a few images from a recent outing to the lovely pine woods of Puslinch Tract:

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Let me count the ways, part 3.

I can’t stop! More love notes to the lake.
(Here are Part 1 and Part 2).

Let me count the ways.

At the risk of sounding like that song in Moana… water calls to me. I can happily park my rear end where the waves meet the shore, zoning out to that endless rhythm.

Unless the humidex is in the 40s and a scorching sun has heated the water to reach a Vanessa-approved temperature, I’m not likely to immerse myself, though. My kids, lucky for them, haven’t inherited my aversion to the cold. They’re happy to splash till their lips turn blue. And then splash some more.

While camping with friends at Long Point Provincial Park on the shores of Lake Erie, I sneaked away from the group at sunset to watch the sky turn purple over the lake. Then, in the early hours of the morning when sleep eluded me, I returned for the pink and orange show. The beach was deserted except for two relentless flies who were, apparently, holding an intense competition to see which one of them could bite my feet more often.

No matter. Flies or no – I love the lake, in its many variations.

 

Worth the wait.

I’m on a “long exposure” kick these days, looking for moving subjects like bubbling brooks and wind-blown grasses and paddling Canada geese. If the camera’s shutter is left open a little (or a lot) longer than the time necessary to freeze the action, the targets become a dreamy, soft blur in the resulting photo. I think what I like best about this technique is that the final picture is often a pleasant and interesting surprise. Our eyes don’t see this way, but the camera can record accumulated time.

More to come…

Geese on Hamilton beach_long exposure (1 of 1)

Be like water.

The wait of water.

Water is beautiful when frozen in time, but now and then I like opening my camera’s shutter for a while and waiting for the magic to happen.