Same/different.

This morning’s walk beside Hespeler’s Silknit Dam resulted in two versions of the same story (aren’t there always at least two? ūüôā).

One is a single moment, frozen in time, and the other is an accumulation of moments, captured with the help of a neutral density filter and a fifteen second exposure. Two photographs, two truths – their variations resulting only from the passage of time and a different lens.

I’ll share them here in response to¬†this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge: Variations on a Theme.

Hespeler Dam (1 of 2)

Hespeler Dam (2 of 2)

Turn, turn, turn.

‚ÄúThe long exposure does something that our eyes cannot do, it can accumulate time,‚ÄĚ says photographer Michael Kenna. I love his dreamy black-and-white landscapes, in which waters and skies appear smooth as silk. And I love the idea of capturing moments of consecutive time, stacked together in one image.

Well, I’ll need some more practice before I can create any ethereal landscapes, but in the meantime, these photos are the results of a little¬†experimentation closer to home (at my dining room table), requiring only a decorative trinket, a slowed shutter speed, and some patience.

We’re often so concerned about sharpness in images – the crispness and clarity of frozen time – but I think there’s something so pretty and painterly about motion being rendered as soft streaks of woven light.

November 24 (1 of 3)November 24 (2 of 3)November 24 (3 of 3)

Good things. Small packages.

A tiny package came for me in the mail the other day: a filter. A small, round, neutral density camera filter.

This girl – who usually collects only bills and realtor¬†brochures from the mailbox – hasn’t been so excited to pick up the mail in a long, long time.

A neutral density filter is mounted on the end of a camera’s lens with the purpose of reducing the amount of light going in. This allows for longer exposures in bright conditions, which can result in interesting photographic effects like motion blur.

With my new toy in hand, I scampered to a source of moving water with no time to waste. I wanted to try making a smooth, milky effect with the movement of the creek. It took some fiddling with the settings, but here are the results of my first time out:

May 21 (1 of 2)May 21 (2 of 2)

Okay. This is WAY more fun than bills and real estate (no offense, realtors).