Not exactly glamorous.

You recall yesterday’s excitement about my new neutral density filter, so I don’t imagine you’re surprised to find another photo of blurred water.

Here, surface runoff turns into silver silk with motion blur and a monochrome treatment.

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Most people like to use this long exposure technique to make photos of babbling brooks and graceful waterfalls.

I wasn’t in the vicinity of either, so I had to settle for a storm sewer drainage pipe.

Use what you’ve got, right?

It’s happening.

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I’m turning into one of those people who say things like, “Look how the light’s falling on that {insert object here}!” and “I wonder what this would look like in black and white?” and “You go on ahead, I just need to make one more photo.”

Multiple personalities.

Yesterday the rain prevented me from strolling around my backyard, but look what I found hiding behind the shed this morning.

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Today I thought I’d share a few versions of my subject, since I’m having a lot of fun learning about post-processing techniques. Holy smokes, it’s easy to lose track of time while a) squinting at things in the backyard and b) playing around in Lightroom. This is bad if you have other tasks you’re supposed to be doing, such as working, eating, sleeping, etc. (I’m supposed to be vacuuming right now).

I tried all three of these shots with a soft, glow-y type of adjustment, then in a monochrome style. It’s amazing how changes in light, tone and focus can impact a photo.

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When I treated the shot below in the same monochrome look as the others, it was super dark and didn’t really preserve a lot of details. I tried an alternative and though it’s better, I still don’t think it really works. I guess sometimes colour just has more impact.

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I’m looking forward to all my backyard discoveries this season.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, the house is not going to vacuum itself.