Worth the wait.

I’m on a “long exposure” kick these days, looking for moving subjects like bubbling brooks and wind-blown grasses and paddling Canada geese. If the camera’s shutter is left open a little (or a lot) longer than the time necessary to freeze the action, the targets become a dreamy, soft blur in the resulting photo. I think what I like best about this technique is that the final picture is often a pleasant and interesting surprise. Our eyes don’t see this way, but the camera can record accumulated time.

More to come…

Geese on Hamilton beach_long exposure (1 of 1)

Be like water.

Twisted.

I suspect people may have thought I was slightly nuts yesterday when they saw me hunched over the flowers at the park, making photos. I used the “intentional camera movement” technique (which never disappoints, in my opinion). That method of photography involves shimmies, wiggles and twists of the camera during exposure, and usually, at least in my case, somewhat contorted body positions.

Ah, well. Being nuts helps me make interesting pictures once in a while.

Daisy day.

Awakening.

*In response to the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Awakening